THE LEGENDS OF THE CASTLE OF TREZZO

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THE LEGENDS OF THE CASTLE OF TREZZO

The castle of Trezzo rises on the shore of the Adda river, in the province of Milan. Built during the Langobard reign, it was a fortification for the Barbarossa first and the Visconti family later. Legends and mysteries have flourished amongst the ruins of this ancient castle. A big treasure, belonged to Federico Barbarossa, emperor of the Sacred Roman Empire in the second half of the 12th century, is said to be hidden here, guarded by ghosts of whole armies, amongst which Barbarossa’s ghost itself.  The Visconti family is also a source of legends: in one of the two pits dug inside the castle, they used to throw down unwanted guests and war prisoners. Some were tortured. In the basement there was a room called “room of the drop”. The basement was excavated in natural caves, very humid, thus water dripped constantly from the ceiling. This room was in this very conditions. Here, the prisoners were tied down below one of these drops, which slowly dug their skull, causing a dreadful death. On some of the walls, there are some red stains which are said to originate from blood of those unlucky men, a reminder of those sad and doomed times for today’s visitors.

The daughter of Bernabò Visconti, landlord at the end of the 14th century, was immured alive in the castle jail after falling in love with a stable boy, also murdered for trying to rescue her. Bernabò died here too, poisoned by Gian Galeazzo Visconti. But more mysteries lie in this ancient building. Long time ago, during an archaeological search, a Longobard man’s skeleton resurfaced: the man was certainly a notable one, given his rich funeral garments. The weird thing is his height, over 2 metres according to the dimension of his bones, a real ancient giant. The man was buried in a 2.40 metre tomb, but fitting him in was a problem, since his height exceeded the length of his grave. Back to the basement, you will meet a door that apparently leads nowhere. The ceiling above has collapsed, thus nowadays it’s impossible to find out. The legend says that this passage went down in the depths of earth to resurface a few kilometres away, in another castle, after passing below the riverbed of Adda river. During the Middle Ages, such subterranean passages were quite common, and they often interconnected castles. Useful in case of a siege, they could be used to escape avoiding the main door. But there’s more. Some think that in these galleries, nowadays closed by time and natural deposits, Barbarossa might have buried his treasure.